Low-dose aspirin >5 years tied to drop in lung cancer risk

  • Ye S & al.
  • JAMA Netw Open
  • 1 Mar 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Receiving low-dose aspirin for >5 years was associated with a modest duration-dependent reduction in incident lung cancer risk, especially among the elderly and people without diabetes.

Why this matters

  • Previous studies of the chemopreventive benefit of low-dose aspirin have produced conflicting results.

Study design

  • 12,969,400 people aged 40-84 years from the Korean National Health Information Database.
  • Follow-up was 63,787,432.9 person-years.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • 0.5% developed lung cancer.
  • Compared with no use, low-dose aspirin use for >5 years was significantly associated with reduced lung cancer risk in a duration-dependent manner (5-6 years' use aHR, 0.96; 7-8 years' use aHR, 0.94; 9 years' use aHR, 0.89; P<.001>
  • Long-term use of low-dose aspirin was significantly associated with reduced risk for lung cancer in:
    • People ≥65 years (5-6 years' use aHR, 0.95; 7-8 years' use aHR, 0.93; 9 years' use aHR, 0.87; P<.001>
    • People without diabetes (5-6 years' use aHR, 0.96; 7-8 years' use aHR, 0.94; 9 years' use aHR, 0.87; P<.001>
  • Long-term low-dose aspirin use was associated with reduced lung cancer risk in men and women, nonobese and obese people, and nonsmokers and smokers.

Limitations

  • Retrospective study with small effect size.

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