Lung cancer: hypoxic preconditioning boosts lung function

  • Zhang W & al.
  • BMC Anesthesiol
  • 11 Nov 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Receiving hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) before thoracoscopic lobectomy for lung cancer was associated with better postoperative lung oxygenation, better pulmonary function, and a shorter hospital stay.

Why this matters

  • Clinical and preclinical studies have suggested that HPC might protect organs after surgery, but studies in patients with lung cancer were lacking.

Study design

  • Prospective, randomized, controlled trial.
  • 70 patients with lung cancer who underwent elective thoracoscopic lobectomy received presurgical HPC (n=38) or usual care (control group, n=32).
  • Lung oxygenation was expressed by the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2)/percentage of inspired oxygen (FiO2).
  • Funding: Zhoushan Municipal Commission Fund of Health and Family Planning; others.

Key results

  • Lung oxygenation was significantly higher in the HPC group vs the control group at 30 minutes after 1-lung ventilation (PaO2/FiO2, 2.01 vs 1.83; P<.05 and days after surgery>2/FiO2, 1.95 vs 1.74; P<.05>
  • At 7 days after surgery, the HPC group had better forced vital capacity (2.77 vs 2.54; P<.05 and forced expiratory volume in second vs p>
  • The HPC group had significantly shorter postoperative length of stay (8.32 vs 10.87 days; P<.05>
  • No significant differences between groups in incidence of pulmonary complications or overall postoperative morbidity.

Limitations

  • Small sample size.