Lung cancer is linked to increased abdominal aortic aneurysm risk

  • Wiles B & al.
  • J Vasc Surg
  • 2 Jul 2020

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Patients with lung cancer are significantly more likely to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) than those without lung cancer.

Why this matters

  • With the known association between smoking and AAAs, these data support extending low-dose chest CT to include the abdomen as a simultaneous screen for both diseases in high-risk patients.

Study design

  • 814 patients with primary lung cancer and 200 people without cancer (control group).
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Prevalence of AAA was significantly higher in patients with lung cancer (11.1%) compared with the control group (2%; P=.0001).
  • 60% of AAAs were 5.5 cm (without accounting for repaired aneurysms).
  • 88.7% of patients with lung cancer were current or former smokers.
  • Having a smoking history was associated with a significantly higher incidence of AAA (11.9% vs 2.2% without; P=.0047).
  • Prevalence of AAA was 12.8% in patients with stage I cancer, 6.8% with stage II, 7.5% with stage III, and 5.6% with stage IV.
  • Independent risk factors (ORs) for AAA:
    • Male sex: 3.70 (P<.001>
    • Increasing age: 1.07 per year (P<.001>
    • Smoking: 1.01 per pack-year (P=.004). 
    • Hypertension: 2.30 (P=.020).

Limitations

  • Single-center, retrospective study.