Maternal HPV status influences oral HPV persistence in offspring

  • Syrjänen S & al.
  • Emerg Infect Dis
  • 29 Jan 2021

  • curated by Liz Scherer
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Non-sexually-acquired HPV infection may be common in children.
  • Maternal HPV status plays a role in oral HPV persistence.

Why this matters

  • Seroconversion to high-risk HPV in mothers increases risk for persistent infections in children, reinforcing importance of timing of maternal vaccination.

Key results

  • 324 newborns (171 girls, 153 boys).
  • Mean age at follow-up: 51.9±28.9 (range, 0.03-99.7) months.
  • At 6 years, 11% had oral lesions: 3.9% hyperplastic, 2.8% aphthous ulcers, 2.2% red lesions.
  • 22.9% of oral samples collected immediately postbirth were HPV DNA-positive.
  • 14.9% children had persistent oral HPV; mean duration 20.6 (range, 0.1-92.2) months.
    • Most prevalent persistent type: HPV16 (persistence time, 19.8 months), multiple-type (14.2 months), HPV18 (11.8 months), HPV33 (14.2 months), HPV6 (19.7 months).
  • Risk (OR, 95% CI) for persistent oral high-risk HPV was associated with:
    • Baseline oral maternal carriage: 1.92 (1.35-2.74).
    • High-risk HPV seroconversion: 1.60 (1.02-3.50).
  • Oral high-risk paternal HPV (incidence rate, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.24-8.91) was also linked to high-risk HPV seropositivity.

Study design

  • Prospective longitudinal cohort characterizing oral HPV prevalence, genotype variation, infection outcomes at age ≤6 years, Finland.
  • Funding: Academy of Finland; others.

Limitations

  • Maternal HPV data missing.
  • No data on HPV-evoked immune recognition.
  • Limited follow-up.