MCI: lifestyle activities are associated with restored cognition

  • Katayama O & al.
  • Arch Gerontol Geriatr
  • 9 Feb 2021

  • curated by Susan London
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are more likely to avoid progression and to experience restoration of their baseline cognition when they take up and continue activities such as reading, hobbies, sports, and socializing.

Why this matters

  • Effective prevention and treatment options for dementia are lacking.

Key results

  • Status after 4 years:
    • 33.3% had experienced restoration of their baseline cognition.
    • 51.4% were still experiencing MCI.
    • 15.3% had experienced progression to global cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Compared with discontinuing lifestyle activities or becoming inactive, starting and maintaining lifestyle activities was associated with (aORs):
    • Stable status: 2.58 (P<.05>
    • Restoration to baseline: 4.20 (P<.05>
  • Continuing productive activities was associated with not experiencing progression.

Study design

  • Prospective cohort study in Japan of 769 community-dwelling older adults ages ≥65 years, with MCI at baseline.
  • Predictors:
    • Change in lifestyle activities, assessed from instrumental activities of daily living, cognitive and social activities (e.g., shopping, reading, engaging in hobbies/sports, taking cultural classes, attending community meetings).
    • Change in productive activities (housecleaning, fieldwork/gardening).
  • Main outcome: change in cognitive status.
  • Funding: Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research; others.

Limitations

  • Residual and unmeasured confounding.
  • Possible social desirability bias, misclassification of cognitive status.
  • Some activities were not assessed.
  • Potential reverse causality.