Mediterranean diet tied to lower risk for bladder cancer

  • Witlox WJA & al.
  • Eur J Nutr
  • 8 Feb 2019

  • curated by Deepa Koli
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • High adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduced risk for bladder cancer.
  • Association was independent of cancer subtype, sex, fat intake.

Why this matters

  • Bladder Cancer Epidemiology and Nutritional Determinants (BLEND) is the largest pooled cohort study to investigate associations between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and risk for bladder cancer.

Study design

  • Study of dietary data from the BLEND including 3639 incident bladder cancer cases and 642,583 participants without bladder cancer across 13 cohort studies.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • After adjustment for total energy intake, smoking status, and sex compared with low adherence to Mediterranean diet, risk for bladder cancer was significantly lower with:
    • high adherence (aHR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.77-0.93) and
    • medium adherence (aHR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.99).
  • An inverse linear association was observed between Mediterranean diet and risk for bladder cancer (aHR for a 1-unit increase in adherence, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.98).
  • The association remained significant for:
    • muscle-invasive and non-muscle-invasive disease,
    • men and women, and
    • after excluding either fats or alcohol from diet score.

Limitations

  • Information on other risk factors was limited.

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