Mental wellbeing of Welsh people

  • Public Health Wales
  • 10 Mar 2020

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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A new interactive profile on Public Health Wales Observatory highlights the mental wellbeing of Welsh adults and secondary school-aged children. The data come from the National Survey for Wales, the Annual Population Survey, and the School Health Research Network.

Key findings are as follows:

  • Between 2013 and 2018, there has been an increase in the rates of Welsh individuals reporting high life satisfaction and happiness. However, these rates still remain lower than those reported in the other three UK nations.
  • Employed individuals showed higher percentages of positive well-being than unemployed individuals.
  • Individuals residing in rented accommodation showed lower percentages of high mental well-being.
  • Adult males had a greater likelihood of reporting low levels of anxiety.
  • Higher mental well-being was reported in younger secondary school-aged children, boys and children with high family affluence.
  • The average scores on the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale were the highest for secondary school-aged children in Vale of Glamorgan and Gwynedd.
  • More than a quarter of young individuals reported receiving inadequate mental health support at school.

James Adamson, Specialty Registrar in Public Health, said: "In 2020, Public Health Wales will launch its new mental wellbeing programme, Hapus, aimed at helping everyone in Wales focus on and do more of the activities they know help them feel good."