Meta-analysis: approximately 1 in 4 adult patients with atopic dermatitis report adult-onset disease

  • Lee HH & al.
  • J Am Acad Dermatol
  • 1 Jun 2018

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • A systematic review and meta-analysis finds that 26% of adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) first developed the disease as an adult.

Why this matters

  • This systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that AD is not only a disease of childhood, which was unclear in prior studies.

Key results

  • 17/25 included studies reported age of AD onset past 16 years.
  • 26.1% of adult patients with AD reported adult-onset disease.
  • The highest proportion of adult-onset AD was observed in the United States (53.0%), with lower proportions in Europe (24.0%), Asia (21.4%), and other regions (24.3%).
  • Child-onset AD was consistently linked with higher proportions of facial dermatitis, conjunctivitis/eyelid dermatitis, cheilitis, pruritus after sweating, xeroderma or xerosis, hand and foot dermatitis, nipple dermatitis, and Dennie-Morgan line.
  • Adult-onset AD was consistently linked with higher proportion of lesions on feet and white dermatographism.

Study design

  • 25 studies including age of AD onset were subjected to meta-analysis.
  • Funding: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Dermatology Foundation.

Limitations

  • Many studies did not report on the differing characteristics between adult- and childhood-onset AD.

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