Meta-analysis: high intake of sugary drinks, juice tied to gout

  • Ayoub-Charette S & al.
  • BMJ Open
  • 5 May 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • A meta-analysis finds that high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and fruit juices, but not fruit, is associated with incident gout.

Why this matters

  • Gout is problematic in its own right, but is also associated with development of hypertension, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular disease.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 3 prospective cohorts (n=154,289; 1761 cases of gout), including the Nurses' Health Study and the National Runner's Health Study.
  • Quality of evidence was evaluated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system.
  • Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research; other.

Key results

  • High vs low intake of fruit juice (risk ratio [RR], 1.77; 95% CI, 1.20-2.61; I2=0%; very low certainty) was associated with incident gout, as was high vs low SSB intake (RR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.40-3.08; I2=0%; moderate certainty).
  • High vs low fruit intake was not associated with incident gout (RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.63-1.14; I2=93%; very low certainty).

Limitations

  • High heterogeneity and very low certainty for the fruit intake finding; very low certainty for the fruit juice finding.
  • Observational designs.