Meta-analysis: IBS tied to more severe depression, anxiety than IBD

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Takeaway

  • While the prevalence of comorbid depression is similarly high in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and IBD, the severity of depression and anxiety is greater in IBS.

Why this matters

  • Comorbid depression and anxiety warrant evaluation and treatment regardless of disorder.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 22 studies (n=1244 with IBS; n=1048 with IBD) that met eligibility criteria after search of PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Library, Wan Fang, SinoMed, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure.
  • Funding: Beijing Municipal Administration; Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission.

Key results

  • 72.7% of studies were judged to be "high quality" according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.
  • No difference was seen in prevalence of depression between IBD and IBS.
  • The IBS group had depression of greater severity (pooled standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.18; P=.01) and anxiety of greater severity (pooled SMD, 0.31; P=.0006) than the IBD group.

Limitations

  • No reporting of actual prevalence rates.
  • Heterogeneity across studies.
  • Depression and anxiety based on self-reported scales that varied across studies.