Meta-analysis links rosacea to cardiometabolic disease risk

  • Chen Q & al.
  • J Am Acad Dermatol
  • 28 Apr 2020

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Rosacea is associated with increased risk for hypertension and dyslipidemia, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Why this matters

  • The association between rosacea and cardiometabolic disease is controversial.

Key results

  • Rosacea vs no rosacea was associated with increased pooled risk ratios (RRs) for:
    • Dyslipidemia: 1.32 (P=.002); and
    • Hypertension: 1.20 (P=.001).
  • Rosacea vs no rosacea was associated (standardized mean differences) with increased:
    • Total cholesterol: 0.42 (P=.001); 
    • Low-density lipoprotein: 0.37 (P=.000); 
    • Triglycerides: 0.28 (P=.006); 
    • Systolic BP: 0.40 (P=.000); 
    • Diastolic BP: 0.50 (P=.002); and
    • Fasting blood glucose: 0.24 (P=.026).
  • Rosacea was not significantly associated (RRs) with:
    • Ischemic heart disease: 0.89 (P=.575); 
    • Stroke: 0.94 (P=.705); or
    • Diabetes: 1.15 (P=.216).
  • Rosacea also was not significantly associated with levels of high-density lipoprotein (standardized mean difference, −0.01; P=.859).

Study design

  • 13 studies (50,442 patients with rosacea) were included in the meta-analysis.
  • Funding: National Natural Science Foundation of China.

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity among included studies.
  • No subgroup analysis by rosacea subtype or severity.