Meta-analysis: psoriasis linked to IBD risk

  • JAMA Dermatol

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • A systematic review and meta-analysis of 9 studies suggests that psoriasis is associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the 2 main forms of IBD.

Why this matters

  • Findings suggest a need for early gastroenterological intervention for bowel symptoms.

Key results

  • Psoriasis was associated with CD in a meta-analysis of 5 case-control studies (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.20-2.40) and 4 cohort studies (risk ratio [RR], 2.53; 95% CI, 1.65-3.89).
  • Psoriasis was associated with UC in 4 case-control studies (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.49-2.05) and 4 cohort studies (RR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.55-1.89).
  • Psoriatic arthritis was associated with CD (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.59-3.03) and UC (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.21-3.00) in 1 case-control study, and with CD (RR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.41-5.32) in 2 cohort studies.

Study design

  • 7,794,087 patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis from 5 case-control/cross-sectional studies and 4 cohort studies were analyzed for risk and odds of CD and UC.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Limitations

  • Limited data available for specific subgroups of patients with psoriasis.

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