Metabolic syndrome linked to infertility and longer time to pregnancy

  • Grieger JA & al.
  • BJOG
  • 7 Feb 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with longer time to pregnancy (TTP) and infertility, independent of obesity.

Why this matters

  • Modifications to metabolic profile may reduce the risk of pregnancy complications and cardiovascular disease in later life.

Study designs

  • This Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study enrolled 5519 nulliparous pregnant women with singleton pregnancies.
  • Data on retrospectively reported TTP and a blood sample to assess metabolic health were collected between 14-16 weeks of gestation.
  • Funding: National Health Service.

Results

  • Of 5519 pregnant women, 684 (12.4%) reported MetS.
  • After adjustment for confounders, women with MetS vs those without had a longer TTP (adjusted time ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.15-1.46) which was similar in obese and non-obese women.
  • Marginal estimates for median TTP was 3.1 (3.0-3.3) months in women with MetS vs 4.1 (3.6-4.5) months in those without MetS.
  • Women with MetS were at a greater risk for infertility (adjusted relative risk [aRR], 1.62; 95% CI, 1.32-1.99) and were at a greater risk for infertility whether they were obese (aRR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.15-2.29) or not (aRR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.33-2.23).
  • Reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated triglycerides were the main components associated with risk for infertility.

Limitations

  • MetS was assessed at 14-16 weeks of gestation rather than pre-pregnancy.