Migraine: how much caffeine is too much?

  • Am. J. Med.
  • 8 Aug 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Migraine headaches are not associated with consumption of ≤2 daily servings of caffeinated beverages among patients who regularly consume ≥1 servings/day.

Why this matters

  • Few prospective studies have examined the association between caffeine consumption and migraine risk.

Study design

  • Prospective cohort study of 98 adults with episodic migraine who provided detailed information on daily caffeinated beverage intake for at least 6 weeks.
  • Funding: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; others.

Key results

  • Overall, 825 headaches were reported over the course of 4467 days, with an average of 8.4 headaches/participant.
  • The average consumption of caffeinated beverages was 7.9 servings/week on an average of 4.5 days/week.
  • A significant nonlinear association was noted between the number of caffeinated beverages and the odds for migraine headache occurrence (P quadratic trend=.024).
  • Consumption of 1-2 servings of caffeinated beverage was not associated with increased odds for headache.
  • Higher odds for headaches were estimated on days with ≥3 servings of caffeinated beverages.
  • With ≥3 servings there was a higher trend for headaches on the following day (not significant).

Limitations

  • The heightened risk could not be associated with the amount of caffeine consumed.

Coauthored with Chitra Ravi, MPharm.

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