Migraine: MAST study identifies allodynia risk factors

  • Dodick DW & al.
  • Cephalalgia
  • 7 Feb 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Migraine patients who were female, current smokers, and had more frequent and severe headaches, anxiety or depression, and acute medication overuse had a greater risk of allodynia.
  • Nearly 40% of participants experienced allodynia.

Why this matters

  • Previous studies suggest that allodynia is an independent predictor of poor acute treatment response to triptans, NSAIDs, opioids, and barbiturate combination products and is a risk factor for migraine recurrence and progression from episodic to chronic migraine.

Study design

  • Study evaluated 15,133 adults with migraine identified by an online survey.
  • Included patients had a headache frequency of ≥3 monthly headache days (MHDs) over the previous 3 months and ≥1 MHD in past 1 month.
  • Funding: Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories group of companies, Princeton, NJ.

Key results

  • 39.9% of total population had allodynia.
  • Women (aOR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.56-1.86) and people who smoked (aOR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.22-1.55) were more likely to have allodynia.
  • Other factors associated with higher allodynia risk were:
    • higher migraine symptom severity score (aOR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.15-1.19);
    • more severe pain intensity score (aOR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.08-1.14);
    • probable depression and/or anxiety (aOR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.67-2.00); and
    • overuse of acute medication (aOR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.09-1.38).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study with self-reported data.

Coauthored with Antara Ghosh, PhD 

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