Moderate-severe pain after VATS for lung cancer is common

  • Sci Rep

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • More than 15% of patients who undergo video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for lung cancer reported moderate-severe postoperative pain within 48 hours of surgery.

Why this matters

  • Decreased postoperative pain is thought to be a benefit of VATS.
  • This study is the first to identify risk factors for moderate-severe postoperative pain after VATS, which could help clinicians identify patients who may need more aggressive pain management.

Study design

  • 1164 patients underwent VATS for lung cancer.
  • Funding: Chinese Ministry of Health-Zhejiang Health Department.

Key results

  • 12.7% of patients reported moderate-severe pain within the first 24 hours of surgery, and 15.6% within the first 48 hours.
  • After multivariable analysis, independent risk factors (ORs) associated with moderate-severe postoperative pain within 24 hours included:
    • Younger age: 0.96 (P<.001>
    • Higher BMI: 1.10 (P=.001).
    • Preoperative existing pain within 1 month: 1.55 (P=.044).
    • History of smoking: 1.86 (P=.001).
  • Independent risk factors associated with postoperative pain within 48 hours were the same as above, as well as the number of chest tubes (OR, 1.48; P=.019).
  • Moderate-severe postoperative pain was associated with significantly lower patient satisfaction (50.5% vs 90.6%; P<.001 but not with longer postoperative hospital stays nausea or vomiting.>

Limitations

  • Single-center, retrospective study.