More clinician-patient talks on smoking risks needed

  • Huo J & al.
  • J Gen Intern Med
  • 21 Jun 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • More than 40% of current smokers have not discussed stopping smoking with their healthcare provider.
  • Even among patients who underwent lung cancer screening (LCS), ~15% did not have these conversations.

Why this matters

  • According to clinical guidelines and LCS reimbursement policies, smoking cessation should be the priority for all current smokers.

Study design

  • 30,132 current smokers from the National Health Interview Survey.
  • Funding: Florida Consortium of National Cancer Institute Centers Program.

Key results

  • Frequency of discussions with a clinician about smoking increased from 2011 to 2015 (51.3% vs 55.4%; P<.0001>
  • Clinician-patient conversations about smoking were more common in patients who were eligible for LCS than in those not eligible (69.5% vs 57.9%; P<.0001>
  • Among patients who underwent LCS, 84.0% of patients who received a CT and 86.0% of those who received an X-ray had discussions with a clinician about smoking.
  • Having a discussion with a healthcare provider about smoking was more likely in patients surveyed in 2015 vs the 2011 referent group (aOR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.04-1.30 for 2015) and those who were LCS-eligible (aOR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.32-1.77).

Limitations

  • Clinician discussions are self-reported by patients and subject to recall problems.