MRSA and C. difficile rates continue to decline as other bacterial infections rise – PHE data

  • Public Health England
  • Public Health England
  • 11 Jul 2019

  • curated by Priscilla Lynch
  • Medical News
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Overall reported rates of MRSA bacteraemia and C. difficile infection have continued to see year on year reductions, according to the latest 2018/2019 data from Public Health England (PHE).

MRSA bacteraemia and C. difficile infection rates were 1.4 and 22.1 per 100,000 population, respectively, in 2018/19, down from 1.5 per 100,000 and 23.9 per 100,000, respectively, in 2017/18.

Declines were seen in both the community and hospital settings, testament to the success of the interventions introduced to combat these infections, said PHE.

In contrast, E. coli and MSSA rates have increased, with the most prominent rises seen in community-onset cases.

The MSSA rate increased slightly from 21.5 cases per 100,000 population in 2017/18 to 21.7 per 100,000 population in 2018/19.

A total of 43,242 cases of E. coli bacteraemia were reported by NHS Trusts in England between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019, a rate of 77.7 cases per 100,000 population (up from 73.7 per 100,000 the previous year)

Rates of Klebsiella spp. also increased, from 17.5 per 100,000 population in 2017/18 to 19.1 per 100,000 population in 2018/19.

Rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia declined slightly, from 7.7 per 100,000 population in 2017/18 to 7.5 per 100,000 population in 2018/19.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) remained the most important primary focus of E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia, causing 49.1%, 33.5%, and 29.7% of cases, respectively.

The highest reported rates across all the pathogens was among those eighty-five years and older especially in males, but there was a substantial number of cases in the younger population too. Prevention strategies should therefore be focused across all patient ages groups, noted PHE.