Multiple primary melanomas tied to subsequent malignancy

  • J Am Acad Dermatol

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database suggests that patients with multiple primary melanomas (MPMs) are at increased risk of internal and cutaneous malignancies.

Why this matters

  • This study supports the hypothesis that patients who develop MPMs have inherited cancer susceptibility.

Key results

  • Risk of subsequent internal malignancy increased with PM number (observed to expected [O/E] ratios of 0.99 for ≥1 PM, 1.14 for ≥2 PMs, and 1.23 for ≥3 PMs; P<.05 for all>
  • The risk of pancreatic cancer was significant in patients with ≥3 PMs before age 60 (O/E ratio, 3.53; P<.05 but not in patients ratio>
  • Internal malignancies with risk correlating with increasing numbers of PMs were ocular melanoma, brain, breast, prostate, renal, thyroid, soft tissue cancer, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Risk of subsequent cutaneous melanoma increased with PM number (O/E ratios of 8.09 for ≥1 PM, 22.52 for ≥2 PMs, and 41.03 for ≥3 PMs; P<.05 for all>

Study design

  • Patients with MPM were identified from the SEER database and analyzed for risk of subsequent malignancy.
  • Funding: NCI/NIH; Stanford University; Melanoma Research Foundation.

Limitations

  • Database has some limited clinical and treatment data.

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