Neonatal infection with COVID-19


  • Heather Mason
  • Univadis Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Evidence published in JAMA Pediatrics suggests that neonatal outcomes following COVID-19 infection are good.

Demographic, epidemiological and clinical data from 33 neonates born to mothers with confirmed COVID-19 infection were reviewed. Only three (9%) infants had COVID-19 infection and were delivered at 31, 40 and 40 weeks gestation, via caesarean section due to maternal pneumonia and either meconium-stained amniotic fluid or foetal distress.

Infant one: presented with lethargy and fever on day 2 of life, with normal laboratory results.

Infant two: presented with lethargy fever and vomiting, with leucocytosis, lymphocytopenia, and an elevated creatine kinase-MB fraction.

Infant three: was born at 31 weeks and two days. Resuscitation was required. Sepsis was suspected, with Enterobacter agglomerates-positive blood culture, leucocytosis, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy.

Chest X-rays on each infant showed pneumonia. Nasopharyngeal and anal swabs for each infant were positive for COVID-19 on days 2 and 4 but negative on day 6/7.

The authors point out that the most seriously ill neonate may have been symptomatic from prematurity rather than COVID-19.

Strict infection control during delivery indicated that viral sources were maternal. Amniotic fluid, cord blood, and breast milk were negative for COVID-19, although vertical transmission was not ruled out.