New HIV Commission aims to end transmission and HIV-related death in England by 2030


  • Jo Whelan
  • Medical News
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A new independent commission will develop evidence-based recommendations on how to end HIV transmissions and HIV-attributed deaths in England by 2030. The HIV Commission was launched on 22 July by the Terrence Higgins Trust and the National Aids Trust, and is endorsed by the UK Government.

  • The Commission will run between August 2019 and March 2020.
  • It will issue a national call for written and oral evidence, host regional community engagement events, write a report, and produce recommendations; these will be published in Spring 2020.
  • The objective is to deliver a set of ambitious and achievable recommendations and promote the delivery of an effective government action plan.

Increased and frequent HIV testing, rapid treatment for those diagnosed with HIV, high rates of condom use and the availability of PrEP have contributed to a 28% drop in new HIV diagnoses in the UK, from 6,095 in 2015 to 4,363 in 2017. This makes an end to new HIV transmissions possible, the Commission says.

Action is needed to ensure progress is made in all affected communities, and to tackle the discrimination and stigma faced by people living with HIV when accessing health care and in all areas of life, the Commission notes.

It will host a series of community events, a public online consultation, and a national call for evidence from those directly affected by HIV. The Commission will be chaired by Dame Inga Beale, former CEO of Lloyds of London.