NICE recommends drug implant for recurrent non-infectious uveitis

  • NICE
  • 20 Jun 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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According to a new guidance issued by the NICE, individuals with recurrent non-infectious uveitis affecting the back of the eye could benefit from the new intravitreal fluocinolone acetonide implant.

The therapeutic effects of the ophthalmic implant are expected to last 3 years. The currently available treatments (corticosteroid injections, immunosuppressants and dexamethasone and adalimumab implants) for preventing recurrence of non-infectious uveitis require frequent visits to the hospital for administration and monitoring. The new implant could mean fewer number of hospital visits and fewer disruptions in the daily lives of patients and carers. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that the fluocinolone acetonide implant may improve the clarity of vision and help prevent the disease recurrence.

Non-infectious uveitis affects ~8,500 individuals in England; however, the number of individuals with recurrent disease who would benefit from the implant remains far less. Meindert Boysen, Director of the Centre for Health Technology Evaluation at NICE, said: "We are happy to be able to provide people with recurrent non-infectious uveitis affecting the posterior segment of the eye with an additional treatment option, particularly one with potentially long-lasting benefits."