NICE updates guidance on CJD risk with interventional procedures

  • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence

  • curated by Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Medical News
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NICE has issued final guidance on reducing the risk for transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) from surgical instruments used for interventional procedures on high-risk tissues - intradural surgery on the brain (including the pituitary gland) and spinal cord, neuroendoscopy and surgery on the retina or optic nerve.

NICE reviewed its 2006 guidance which said that those born after 1996, undergoing an interventional procedure, should have their own set of neuroendoscopes and reusable surgical instruments.

The updated guidance reaffirms previous recommendations made in 2006 around having a separate pool of neuroendoscopes and reusable surgical instruments for high-risk procedures. However, there is now no longer a requirement to have separate sets of neuroendoscopes and reusable surgical instruments for use on high-risk tissues for people born after 1996.

The guidance is specifically intended for interventional procedures on high-risk tissues - intradural surgery on the brain (including the pituitary gland) and spinal cord, neuroendoscopy and surgery on the retina or optic nerve.

NICE recommends ensuring all surgical instruments that have come into contact with high-risk tissues during an interventional procedure are kept moist until decontamination and advises that rigid neuroendoscopes (rather than flexible neuroendoscopes) should be used if possible.

The committee said the evidence on cost effectiveness does not support the use of single-use instruments to reduce the risk for CJD transmission.