Night shift workers have higher overactive bladder scores


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Night shift workers have a higher overactive bladder score with an impairment of quality of life, according to findings from a new prospective study presented at the 34th European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona, Spain at the weekend. 

For the study, researchers from the Sant’Andrea Hospital in Rome surveyed 68 men and 68 women between March and October 2018, all aged below 50 years. All were workers in the Italian national health system, with 66 of the volunteers working in night shifts, on average, 11 hours per night shift. The 70 day-workers worked on an average of 9.1 hours/day. 

The researchers found that the night shift workers reported a significantly higher rate of overactive bladder and poorer quality of life when compared with day shift workers. 

“We know that long-term night work is stressful and is associated with increased levels of health problems. This work shows that constant night workers may have a higher urinary frequency as well as a decline in their own quality of life. Furthermore, we have measured these changes in health workers, who are themselves responsible for looking after the well-being of patients. If they feel bad themselves, then this will inevitably lead to poorer patient care,” said lead researcher, Dr Cosimo De Nunzio. 

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