Non-melanoma skin cancer remains most common cancer globally


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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The latest data from the Global Burden of Disease Study show that increased efforts are needed in cancer prevention and ensuring universal access to cancer care.

The Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration has presented data on cancer burden for 29 cancer groups in 195 countries from 1990 to 2017.

The data show that there were 24.5 million incident cancer cases worldwide in 2017 and 9.6 million cancer deaths. The odds of developing cancer were significantly higher among those in the highest socio-demographic index (SDI) compared to those in the lowest SDI (1 in 2 vs 1 in 7).

Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) remained the most common incident cancer in both men and women.

In men, the next most common cancers were tracheal, bronchus and lung (TBL) cancer, which accounted for 1.5 million cases, and prostate cancer, which accounted for 1.3 million cases. The most common causes of cancer deaths for men were TBL cancer, liver cancer and stomach cancer.

For women, after NMSC, the most common cancers were breast cancer, which accounted for 1.9 million cases, and colorectal cancer (819,000 cases). The leading causes of cancer deaths for women were breast cancer, TBL cancer and colorectal cancer.

The full data are published in JAMA Oncology.

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