Nosocomial transmission driving increases in Ebola cases in DRC


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Almost six months after the Ebola outbreak was declared in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), authorities say that as of January 29, the death toll has risen to 465, with an overall case fatality ratio of 62 per cent. 

Authorities continue efforts to contain the outbreak, despite persistent challenges around security and community mistrust.

High numbers of cases have been reported in recent weeks, with 118 new cases between January 9 and January 29. The highest number of cases in this period has been in Katwa (80). The World Health Organization (WHO) says the outbreak in Katwa and Butembo, where seven cases were reported in the 21-day period, is partly being driven by nosocomial transmission in private and public health centres. 

Since 1 December 2018, 86 per cent of cases in these areas had visited or worked in a health care facility before or after the onset of illness. Of those, 21 per cent reported contact with a health care facility before the onset of illness, suggesting possible nosocomial transmission, it said. 

“Response teams are following up with the identified healthcare facilities to address gaps around triage, case detection and infection prevention and control measures,” the WHO added. 

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit