NSAIDs use and risk for Alzheimer’s disease mortality in older adults

  • Benito-León J & al.
  • PLoS ONE
  • 1 Jan 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with a decreased risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) mortality in older adults.

Why this matters

  • Findings support the hypothesis that the use of NSAIDs is a protective factor of developing AD.

Study design

  • This population-based study included 5072 participants without AD (age, ≥65 years) who were followed for a median of 12.7 years.
  • Sociodemographic, comorbidity factors, and current medications were recorded at baseline.
  • Funding: Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional and Sanidad de Castilla y Leo´n.

Key results

  • Of 5072 participants, 2672 (52.7%) died over a median follow-up of 6.8 (range, 0.01-13.8) years, including 504 (18.9%) NSAIDs users and 2168 (81.1%) non-users.
  • Of 2672 deceased participants, 113 died because of AD (8 [1.6%] among NSAIDs users and 105 [4.8%] in non-users; chi-square, 10.70; P=.001).
  • In an unadjusted Cox model, NSAIDs users vs non-users were at a lower risk for AD mortality (HR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.17-0.72; P=.004).
  • After adjusting for confounders:
    • The risk for AD mortality was lower in NSAIDs users vs non-users (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.12-0.73; P=.009).
    • Aspirin NSAIDs significantly reduced the risk for AD mortality (HR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.10-0.90; P=.033).
    • Risk for AD mortality decreased with non-aspirin NSAIDs but did not reach statistical significance (HR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.10-1.03; P=.056).

Limitation

  • Study did not consider the dose and frequency of NSAIDs.
  • Data on NSAIDs exposure for any intermediate time intervals between baseline and follow-up were not included.