Obesity, hypertension, and diuretic use tied to gout risk

  • Evans PL & al.
  • Arthritis Res Ther
  • 5 Jul 2018

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • In primary care and general populations, obesity, hypertension, and diuretic use are all independent risk factors for incident gout and each more than doubling the risk of developing gout vs those without these conditions.

Why this matters

  • Despite therapeutic advances gout treatment remains suboptimal, identifying populations at risk of developing gout may provide opportunities for primary prevention.

Study design

  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of 14 studies involving patients with incident gout from inception to March 2017.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • In 4 studies, the risk for gout was found to be significantly high among patients with BMI of ≥30 kg/m2 (adjusted relative risk [RR], 2.24; 95% CI, 1.76–2.86) vs non-obese patients.
  • In 10 studies, patients with hypertension had a higher risk of developing gout (aHR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.34–2.01 and RR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.64–2.72) vs normotensive participants.
  • In 2 studies, diuretic use was found to be associated with a significant increase in the risk of developing gout (aRR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.57-3.65; P=.008).

Limitations

  • Self-reported data.
  • Risk for bias.