Obesity linked to increased risk for Crohn’s disease

  • Rahmani J & al.
  • Obes Rev
  • 12 Jun 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • This meta-analysis found that higher body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with increased risk for Crohn's disease (CD).
  • However, no association was observed between higher BMI and risk for ulcerative colitis (UC).

Why this matters

  • Considering the growing epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is important to provide definitive conclusions about its association with body weight.
  • Health care providers and clinicians can incorporate these findings when managing relevant patient groups.

Study design

  • 5 prospective cohort studies (n=1,044,517) that evaluated the association between BMI and IBD were included after a search across MEDLINE/PubMed, SCOPUS and other databases.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Pooled results of 4 studies showed that higher vs normal BMI was significantly associated with increased risk for CD (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.18‐1.71; P=.001).
  • The risk for UC did not differ in participants with higher vs normal BMI  (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.80‐1.14; P=.635).
  • No significant association observed between being underweight and risk for UC (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.96‐1.19; P=.236) or CD (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.93‐1.31; P=.253).
  • In the dose-response analysis, BMI was significantly associated with risk for CD (coeff=0.5024; P=.01) and non-significantly associated with risk for UC (coeff=−0.0099; P=.95).

Limitations

  • BMI may be a poor indicator of age-associated changes in fat distribution.