Only 2% of eligible smokers are screened for lung cancer

  • Clin Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Lung cancer screening in the United States remains highly underused, with only 2% of eligible smokers undergoing low-dose CT (LDCT) in 2016.

Why this matters

  • The US Preventive Services Task Force has recommended annual LDCT for lung cancer in high-risk patients since 2013.

Study design

  • 7,613,000 people from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplement who were eligible for lung cancer screening.
  • Funding: Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation.

Key results

  • Only 2% of eligible smokers received LDCT for lung cancer in 2016.
  • In 2016, the south had the largest number of smokers eligible for screening (40.4%), and the northeast had the lowest (15%).
  • The west had the lowest screening rate (1.1%), followed by the south (1.7%), the Midwest (2.1%), and the northeast (3.9%).
    • 84% of those screened were offered smoking cessation support.
  • There were 1962 screening sites in 2016 in the United States that were accredited by the American College of Radiology.
  • The south had the highest number of accredited facilities (n=728), followed by the Midwest (n=551), the northeast (n=441), and the west (n=242).

Limitations

  • Only American College of Radiology-accredited screening sites were included.