Orthostatic hypotension: are the risk factors different in elderly men and women?

  • Méndez AS & al.
  • Am J Hypertens
  • 30 Mar 2018

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) was found to be similar in men and women <75 years of age but was significantly higher in men than in women ≥75 years.
  • Increased risk for OH was seen in women with systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg, while BMI was a protective factor for OH in men and women.

Why this matters

  • Presence of OH has been found to be associated with common cardiovascular risk factors such as ageing, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension.

Study design

  • Cross-sectional study of 882 participants (women, n=547; men, n=330) from Maracaibo Aging Study.
  • Patients were assessed for OH using BP measurement.
  • Funding: National Institute on Aging; Fogarty International Center.

Key results

  • Mean age of the participants was 66.7±8.5 years.
  • Overall, 170 participants reported OH and the prevalence was similar among both sexes.
  • Risk for OH was significantly higher among men older than 75 years vs women (P=.003).
  • Systolic BP of ≥140 mm Hg (OR, 4.53; 95% CI, 1.94-10.58; P=.0001) and high pulse pressure (PP; PP, 0.939; for high PP*sex, 0.014) were found to be related with OH accounted by interaction sex-term.
  • Univariate analysis showed significant risk for OH in women with BP ≥140 mm Hg (P=.001), and significantly lower risk for OH associated with BMI for both sexes.

Limitations

  • Use of conventional BP measurements.
  • Self-reported measurements.