Out of sight, out of mind – smoking rates in UK children

  • Tobacco Control

  • curated by Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

The risk for 11- to 16-year-old children in the UK taking up smoking has reduced since the introduction of the ban on open display advertising of tobacco products, according to a new study from the University of Stirling.

Published in the BMJ’s Tobacco Control and funded by Cancer Research UK, the repeat cross-sectional in-home survey was conducted with young people aged 11-16 years old in the UK at different timepoints: pre-ban (2011; n=1373), mid-ban (2014; n=1205) and post-ban (2016; n=1213). The analysis focused on never-smokers in the sample (n=2953).

The authors observed that pre-ban, noticing cigarettes displayed at the point of sale (POS) and higher brand awareness were positively associated with smoking susceptibility (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.97; 95% CI, 1.30-2.98 and aOR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.03-1.29, respectively). The mean number of brands recalled declined from 0.97 pre-ban to 0.69 post-ban (P<.001>

Smoking susceptibility decreased from 28 per cent pre-ban to 23 per cent mid-ban and 18 per cent post-ban (Ptrend

Post-ban, 90 per cent of never-smokers supported the display ban and indicated that it made cigarettes seem unappealing (77%) and made smoking seem unacceptable (87%).

Lead author, Dr Allison Ford, from Stirling's Institute for Social Marketing, said: "Our work confirms that placing tobacco out of sight helps safeguard young people. Our findings help to justify this policy approach in the UK and elsewhere."

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit