Paracetamol may increase stroke risk in people with diabetes


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Paracetamol may significantly increase stroke risk in people with diabetes, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

With recent research suggesting that paracetamol may be linked with adverse events and mortality at therapeutic dosage, researchers explored the association of paracetamol usage with mortality and major cardiovascular events among 5,429 older adults living in 175 nursing homes in France. Of these, 2,239 participants were taking, on average, 2352 ± 993 mg of paracetamol daily, while 3,190 were not taking paracetamol. 

They found there was no increase in death and myocardial infarction between paracetamol users and non-users after an 18‐month follow‐up. The number of strokes was also similar in both groups. However, the authors found paracetamol intake was linked with an increased stroke risk in patients with diabetes (HR 3.19; 95% CI 1.25‐8.18; P=.0157). 

The authors said that while paracetamol still represents a safe first‐line choice in pain management for most patients, it should be considered with some more caution for older adults with diabetes. “As our population gets older and frailer, studies need to focus on the safety of the drugs these frail older adults commonly use to better our practice,” the authors concluded. 

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