Parkinson’s disease: dietary intake of vitamins C and E is linked to protective effect

  • Hantikainen E & al.
  • Neurology
  • 6 Jan 2021

  • curated by Susan London
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Individuals in the general population with high dietary intakes of vitamins C and E have lower risks for Parkinson’s disease (PD), even after adjustment for potential confounders.

Why this matters

  • Limited options are available for prevention and treatment of PD.
  • Lifestyle factors amenable to intervention are attractive.

Key results

  • During a mean 17.6-year follow-up, 465 participants developed PD.
  • Multivariate risk (HR, 95% CIs) was lower for top vs bottom tertile of dietary intake for:
    • Vitamin C: 0.68 (0.52-0.89; P for trend=.004).
    • Vitamin E: 0.68 (0.52-0.90; P for trend=.005).
  • A slight additional benefit was detected for participants in the top tertile for both vs bottom tertile for both:
    • HR, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.43-0.89; P for trend=.005).
  • In stratified analysis:
    • Benefit of higher dietary vitamin C intake was limited to participants with BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and low coffee intake.
    • Benefit of higher dietary vitamin E intake was limited to participants with BMI ≥25 kg/m2.
  • No significant associations detected for dietary beta-carotene, dietary total nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity.

Study design

  • Population-based, prospective cohort study of 43,865 men and women ages 18-94 years followed during 1997-2016 (Swedish National March Cohort).
  • Main outcome: Parkinson’s disease.
  • Funding: Swedish Cancer Society; ICA AB; Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.

Limitations

  • Diet was self-reported.
  • Dietary intake assessed once, at baseline.
  • Potential residual, unmeasured confounding.
  • Unknown generalizability.