Parkinson’s disease: low vitamin D levels linked with non-motor symptoms


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Findings from a new study suggest that low vitamin D levels in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are linked with falls and some non‐motor symptoms, with the authors suggesting vitamin D supplementation could be a potential therapy for non‐motor PD symptoms.

The study, published in Acta Neurologica Scandinavia, included 182 patients with PD and 185 healthy controls. Levels of serum 25‐hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured in participants. 

The study found patients with PD had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D levels relative to healthy controls. Patients with PD also had a significantly lower mean BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. 

After adjusting for age, sex and body mass index, the study found vitamin D levels significantly correlated with falls, insomnia and scores for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, depression and anxiety. 

The authors said the finding that vitamin D levels and clinical symptoms were correlated in patients with PD suggests that vitamin D plays an important role in PD pathogenesis. 

“As various non-motor symptoms place a burden on individuals with Parkinson’s disease and their caregivers, vitamin D might be a potential add-on therapy for improving these neglected symptoms,” said senior author Chun‐Feng Liu, of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, in China.