Participation in 'Dry January' can have sustained benefits

  • University of Sussex
  • 27 Dec 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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According to a new research, individuals who participate in 'Dry January – living alcohol-free for a month' are likely to be drinking less six months later.

Using online surveys, researchers at the University of Sussex compared the experiences of individuals who participated in the Dry January 2019 challenge with drinkers who did not participate.

The findings showed that Dry January participants experienced an increased sense of self-control six months later compared with the general population. At the time of follow-up in August 2019, alcohol consumption in Dry January participants was lesser than that at the start of the year, whereas there was no change in consumption in the general population. Additionally, the results showed that 87 per cent of participants had a sense of achievement, 80 per cent felt greater control over their drinking, 84 per cent saved money and 72 per cent had better sleep.

Dr Richard de Visser, who led the study, said: "Some people worry that if they abstain in January, they’ll drink to excess afterwards – but our research shows that in general this doesn’t happen. Dry January gives people the chance to try out living without alcohol for a while to see what happens."