Pediatric AML: risk for cytogenetic abnormalities rises with BMI

  • Løhmann DJA & al.
  • Cancer Med
  • 18 Sep 2019

  • curated by David Reilly
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • In children with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML), odds of harboring t(8;21) or inv(16) cytogenetic abnormalities increased with BMI.

Why this matters

  • This may be the first reported study linking BMI standard deviation score and incidence of cytogenetic abnormalities in children with AML.

Study design

  • Study to investigate associations between BMI prior to therapy and outcomes in a cohort from 10 different countries of 867 children with de novo AML.
  • 10 (range, 2-17) years median age at diagnosis.
  • Funding: Danish Childhood Cancer Foundation, Danish Cancer Society, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute.

Key results

  • No significant difference in incidence of relapse, treatment-related mortality, or overall mortality by BMI.
  • Cytogenetic abnormalities among patients with available genetic data:
    • 19% had t(8;21).
    • 10% had inv(16).
    • 12% had KMT2A rearrangement.
  • Odds of harboring t(8;21) or inv(16) increased with increasing BMI vs patients with healthy weight:
    • t(8;21) in overweight and obese patients: aOR=1.2 (95% CI, 0.7‐1.9) and 1.9 (95% CI, 1.1-3.4).
    • inv(16) in overweight and obese patients: aOR=1.6 (95% CI, 0.8‐3.0) and 2.8 (95% CI, 1.3-5.8).

Limitations

  • BMI groups were assessed at diagnosis; weight change during treatment was not taken into account.