People living in high-income countries have the lowest confidence in vaccines - Wellcome report

  • Gallup
  • Wellcome
  • 19 Jun 2019

  • curated by Priscilla Lynch
  • Univadis
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People living in high-income countries have the lowest confidence in vaccines, according to the findings of the Wellcome Global Monitor 2018 report.

The Wellcome Global Monitor is the world’s largest study into what people around the world believe about science and major health challenges. It surveys over 140,000 people from more than 140 countries.

Key findings in relation to vaccination include:

  • Worldwide, 79 per cent of people agree that vaccines are safe and 84 per cent agree they are effective.
  • Bangladesh and Rwanda have the strongest confidence in vaccines.
  • The lowest confidence levels in vaccines are in Western Europe where 22 per cent disagree that vaccines are safe, and in Eastern Europe where 17 per cent disagree that vaccines are effective.
  • France has the lowest levels of trust in vaccines globally, where 33 per cent of people disagree that vaccines are safe and 10 per cent disagree they are important for children to have.
  • 92 per cent of parents worldwide say their children have received a vaccine to protect against childhood illness.
  • The countries with the highest numbers of parents claiming to not vaccinate their children are China, Austria, and Japan.
  • Trust in vaccines tends to be strongly linked to trust in scientists and medical professionals.

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