Periodontitis and hypertension risk: what's the association?

  • Muñoz Aguilera E & al.
  • Cardiovasc Res
  • 24 Sep 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • This meta-analysis suggests that patients with moderate to severe periodontitis (PD) are at an increased risk of developing hypertension compared to those without PD.

Why this matters

  • Findings highlight the potential to improve cardiovascular outcomes by addressing poor oral health in the general population.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis included 81 studies after a search across electronic databases.
  • Primary outcome: prevalence of hypertension in patients with PD vs those without PD.
  • Funding: The Department of Health’s NIHR Biomedical Research Centre funding scheme.

Key results

  • Moderate-severe (OR, 1.22 [95% CI, 1.10-1.35]; I2, 85%; P=.0001) and severe (OR, 1.49 [95% CI, 1.09-2.50]; I2, 74%; P=.01) PD were associated with an increased risk for hypertension.
  • Prospective studies confirmed that PD diagnosis was associated with an increased likelihood of hypertension occurrence (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 0.85-3.35).
  • Patients with PD had higher mean systolic blood pressure (SBP; weighted mean difference [WMD], 4.49 [95% CI, 2.88-6.11] mmHg; I2, 98%; P<.00001 and diastolic blood pressure wmd ci mmhg p vs those without pd.>
  • Only 5 out of 12 interventional studies confirmed a reduction in SBP (range, 3-12.5 mmHg) and DBP (range, 0-10 mmHg).

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity among included studies.
  • Risk of bias.

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