Polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions in people with HIV in the UK: new real-world data.


  • Jo Whelan
  • Medical News
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Real-world information on drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in people living with HIV (PLHIV) in the UK has been published in a new study. Data from 4,630 adults with a current antiretroviral (ARV) prescription attending four UK HIV centres were collected using the Climate-HIV electronic recording system, and interactions checked via the Liverpool HIV Interaction checker.

  • 44% of the sample were female and 41% were aged 50 years or over; 40% had one or more comorbid health conditions, the most common being hepatitis B, mental health disorders, and hypertension (6% each).
  • PLHIV aged  ≥ 50  were taking a median (interquartile range) of 2 (1–5) non‐ARV medication, compared with 1 (0–2) for those aged
  • Boosted protease inhibitors were associated with the highest proportion of contraindicated comedications, and dolutegravir and raltegravir had the fewest.
  • The non-ARV medications most likely to result in DDIs were sildenafil and quetiapine.
  • Treatments for hepatitis C, hepatitis B and tuberculosis had the highest propensity for contraindications when combined with ARV regimens.
  • Treatments for hepatitis C, malignancy, and mental health conditions had the highest propensity for combinations potentially causing DDIs that required dose monitoring or adjustment.

A limitation of the study was that prescriptions made outside of the reporting hospital were patient-reported and may have been underreported.

The results reinforce the need for ongoing review of concomitant medications and increased communication between healthcare professionals in order to empower patients and reduce drug burden, the authors say.