Postpartum thyroiditis: does type of fish eaten in pregnancy affect risk?

  • Benvenga S & al.
  • Endocrine
  • 6 Mar 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • A cohort study suggests that stable consumption of swordfish is associated with higher rates of postpartum thyroiditis compared with consumption of oily fish.

Why this matters

  • Findings suggest that consumption of swordfish, which is enriched in pollutants, can lead to higher rates of postpartum thyroid problems.

Key results

  • Women who selectively/predominantly consumed swordfish had higher positivity rates for serum thyroid autoantibodies (21.7% vs 4.7% [P<.0001 for tpoab vs tgab and higher rates of postpartum thyroiditis compared with women who selectively consumed oily fish.>
  • Women who ate swordfish not predominantly plus other fish, not necessarily oily fish, had 15.7% prevalence of postpartum thyroiditis, whereas women who ate fish other than swordfish and oily fish had 13.7% prevalence of postpartum thyroiditis (P<.05 for both vs women who ate oily fish selectively>
  • The highest prevalence of postpartum thyroiditis (40%) was found in women who did not eat fish.
  • Approximately 55% of women with postpartum thyroiditis developed permanent hypothyroidism.

Study design

  • 236 pregnant women were analyzed for associations between fish consumption and development of postpartum thyroid problems.
  • Funding: Regional Department of Health.

Limitations

  • Conclusions may be specific to this geographic region (Messina, Italy).
  • No multivariate analysis.