Pregnancy history predicts premature postpregnancy hypertension

  • Egeland GM & al.
  • J Am Heart Assoc
  • 13 May 2018

  • curated by Elisabeth Aron, MD, MPH, FACOG
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Pregnancy history may predict subsequent hypertension in women.

Why this matters

  • Identification of risk factors may allow for increased monitoring and interventions to reduce the burden of premature cardiovascular disease in women.

Key results

  • Overweight/obese prepregnancy BMI, prepregnancy daily smoking, low educational level, poor diet quality, low physical activity level, and high weight retention at 6 months postpartum were associated with a greater risk for subsequent hypertension.
  • Occasional and weekly alcohol consumption, a greater duration of oral contraceptive use before pregnancy, and breastfeeding daily at 6 months were associated with a decreased risk for subsequent hypertension.
  • Women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (HR, 8.4; 95% CI, 6.49-10.88) or gestational hypertension (HR, 12.07; 95% CI, 9.09-16.03), diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes mellitus (HR, 3.36; 95% CI, 2.05-5.51), and preterm delivery (HR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.59-3.02) were more likely to have hypertension within 10 years.

Study design

  • Population-based cohort study.
  • Cohort taken from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), a prospective population-based pregnancy cohort conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
  • Primary outcome was subsequent pharmacologically treated hypertension.
  • Funding: Norwegian Institute for Public Health; University of Bergen.

Limitations

  • Family history lacking.
  • Homogeneous population; results possibly not generalizable.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit