Pro-inflammatory diet linked to colorectal cancer risk


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new study published in the journal Nutrients suggests a link between a pro-inflammatory diet (e.g. refined carbohydrates, mono-sodium glutamate, gluten, aspartame, alcohol and trans fats) and risk for colon cancer.

In the population-based multi-case-controlled study, researchers in Spain calculated the energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (E-DII) and total dietary non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity (NEAC) in 1,852 colorectal cancer and 1,486 breast cancer cases, along with 3,447 and 1,652 population controls, respectively.

Analysis of the data revealed that E-DII was associated with increased risk for colorectal cancer (highest versus lowest quartile odds ratio [OR] 1.93; 95% CI 1.60-2.32; Ptrend<.001 the association was observed for both colon and rectal cancer. less pronounced breast cancer versus lowest quartile or ci p>trend>.10).

The combination of high E-DII scores and low antioxidant values was associated with colorectal cancer risk (highest versus lowest quartile OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.26-1.74; Ptrend<.001 but not breast cancer.>

The authors concluded that the findings provide evidence that a pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, while findings for breast cancer are less consistent.