Prurigo nodularis: serlopitant reduces pruritus in phase 2 trial

  • J Am Acad Dermatol

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Results from a phase 2, randomized controlled trial suggest that serlopitant improves pruritus in patients with prurigo nodularis.

Why this matters

  • Serlopitant, a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist, may represent a future treatment for chronic, treatment-refractory prurigo nodularis.

Key results

  • Serlopitant was associated with improved itch visual analog scale (VAS) score compared with placebo at weeks 2 (least squares mean difference, −0.9; P=.011), 4 (−1.0; P=.025), and 8 (−1.7; P<.001>
  • At week 8, serlopitant was associated with greater improvements in pruritus on the verbal rating scale (no or mild pruritus: serlopitant 54.4% vs placebo 28.9%; P=.006) and lesions on the Investigator’s Global Assessment (66.7% with serlopitant vs 40.4% with placebo; P=.025).
  • Treatment-emergent adverse events were reported in 71.9% of patients receiving serlopitant and 61.9% of patients receiving placebo.
  • The most common treatment-emergent adverse events in patients receiving serlopitant were nasopharyngitis (17.2%), diarrhea (10.9%), and fatigue (9.4%).

Study design

  • 128 patients with chronic, treatment-refractory prurigo nodularis were randomly assigned to serlopitant 5 mg (N=65) or placebo (N=63) orally once daily for 8 weeks.
  • The primary endpoints were change in itch VAS score at weeks 4 and 8.
  • Funding: Menlo Therapeutics Inc.

Limitations

  • Short treatment duration.
  • No comparator treatment.
  • Small patient sample size.

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