PSA testing pros and cons: clinicians fail to inform most patients

  • Cooper DL & al.
  • Am J Mens Health

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • More men report receiving the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test than those who report being informed about the test by their physicians.

Why this matters

  • PSA screening guidelines from major health organizations recommend that men have opportunities to make informed decisions about being screened after conversations with their health care providers about potential advantages, disadvantages, and uncertainties.

Study design

  • Researchers studied survey data from men who had a routine checkup within 2 years, had never been told that they had cancer, and reported whether they ever had a PSA test (n=3877; age range, 40-74 years; 59.3% white).
  • Investigators used binomial logistic regression models to assess the relationships between race/ethnicity and being informed about and receiving the PSA test.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • Most men (72.0%) reported that they were not informed about the advantages and disadvantages of the PSA test.
  • More than half (54.3%) received the test.
  • Black men were most likely to report being informed (40.3%; P<.001>
    • 61.3% reported receiving testing recommendations from their providers (P<.001>
  • White men were more likely to report receiving the test (63.1%).

Limitations

  • The study was cross-sectional and did not confirm causality.
  • Study data were self-reported and subject to recall bias.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit