Race, socioeconomic status influences gastric cancer risk

  • Gastroenterology

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • The incidence of noncardia gastric cancer is significantly higher in racial/ethnic minorities, whereas the rate of cardia gastric cancer is significantly higher in non-Hispanic whites (NHW).
  • Incidence of noncardia increased as neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES) decreased, but the opposite was true for cardia cancer.

Why this matters

  • The findings could help clinicians develop more effective prevention and detection strategies in high-risk patient groups.

Study design

  • 77,881 patients with gastric cancer from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.
  • Funding: NIH; others.

Key results

  • Compared with NHWs, minority groups had significantly lower adjusted incident rate ratios (aIRRs) for cardia but significantly higher aIRRs for noncardia cancer.
    • Cardia: Noncardia: Blacks, 0.55 (95% CI, 0.52-0.59); Hispanics, 0.63 (95% CI, 0.60-0.66); Asian/Pacific Islanders, 0.59 (95% CI, 0.56-0.62); and American Indian/Alaska natives, 0.65 (95% CI, 0.53-0.79).
    • Noncardia: Blacks, 2.78 (95% CI, 2.69-2.87); Hispanics, 2.82 (95% CI, 2.74-2.91); Asian/Pacific Islanders, 3.86 (95% CI, 3.75-3.97); American Indian/Alaska natives, 1.72 (95% CI, 1.50-1.97).
  • Incidence of noncardia cancer increased as nSES decreased (16.6% for highest nSES vs 23.3% for lowest), whereas the inverse was true for cardia (21.2% for highest nSES vs 15.2% in the lowest).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study.

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