Radioiodine for thyroid cancer: 1 in 2 patients feel they have no choice

  • J Clin Oncol

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • 55.8% of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) perceived that they did not have a choice about whether to receive radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, according to survey results.

Why this matters

  • Despite unclear benefits in patients with DTC, RAI but is still a common treatment option.
  • Findings underscore a need for more shared decision-making.

Key results

  • 75.9% of patients received RAI.
  • 55.8% of patients responded that they did not have a choice in receiving RAI.
  • Perception of no choice was more likely when the physician strongly recommended RAI (aOR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.13-2.17).
  • Patients who felt they did not have a choice were more likely to receive RAI (aOR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.64-3.82) and report lower decision satisfaction (aOR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.67-3.20).
  • Odds of receiving RAI were greater for patients with N1 disease compared with those with N0 disease (aOR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.42-4.17).

Study design

  • 2632 patients with DTC from the Georgia and Los Angeles Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries responded to the survey; 1319 (999 who received RAI, 320 who did not) were included in the study after analytic exclusions.
  • Funding: National Cancer Institute; California Department of Public Health; CDC.

Limitations

  • Potential recall bias.

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