Real-world data on SGLT2 inhibitors and risk of serious renal events


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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Treating type 2 diabetes with sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors may help to lower the risk of serious kidney problems, according to a study in the BMJ.

Clinical trials have shown that SGLT2 inhibitors protect renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes, but their effect on serious renal events in real-world clinical practice remains uncertain.

This new observational study used national registry data from Sweden, Denmark, and Norway between 2013-18 to identify 29,887 new SGLT2 inhibitor and 29,887 new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor users. Hospital records and death statistics were used to track serious renal events over an average of two years.

SGLT2 inhibitors were associated with a reduced risk of serious renal events (2.6 events per 1,000 person-years versus 6.2 events per 1,000 person-years), equating to a difference of 3.6 fewer events per 1,000 person-years or a 58 per cent lower relative risk of serious renal events with SGLT2 inhibitors.

Further analysis found greater risk reduction in patients with underlying cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD).

The results are consistent with previous research and add new evidence that SGLT2 inhibitors seem preferable to DPP-4 inhibitors in patients at risk of developing or worsening kidney disease.