Record infant vaccination rates in 2017 - UNICEF/WHO

  • WHO/UNICEF
  • WHO/UNICEF
  • 15 Jul 2018

  • curated by Priscilla Lynch
  • Univadis
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A record-breaking total of around 123 million, or nine out of 10 infants, received at least one dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine in 2017, according to new global figures.

An additional 4.6 million infants were vaccinated globally in 2017, compared to 2010, due to the pace of global population growth, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) report.

The 2017 data shows that 167 countries included a second dose of measles vaccine as part of their routine vaccination schedule, and 162 countries now use rubella vaccines. As a result, global coverage against measles and rubella increased from 35 per cent in 2010 to 52 per cent last year. 

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been introduced in 79 countries, while usage of meningococcal, malaria, pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines are also on the rise.

However, almost 20 million infants did not receive the benefits of full immunisation in 2017. Of these, almost 8 million live in fragile or crisis-affected areas.

The WHO has called for further efforts to reach the nearly five million unvaccinated children in the WHO South-East Asia Region.

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