Red meat consumption tied to excess risk for CKD

  • Mirmiran P & al.
  • J Ren Nutr
  • 14 Aug 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • High consumption of red meat is tied to an increased likelihood of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Why this matters

  • Findings support those of the ARIC study, showing that the highest vs lowest quartile of red and processed meat intake is linked to 23% higher risk for CKD.

Study design

  • Prospective Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study involving 4881 adults aged ≥20 years with normal baseline renal function (mean age, 40.1±12.8 years; 47% women).
  • Mean meat intake on food frequency questionnaire was 1.17 servings/day.
  • Funding: Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences.

Key results

  • Rate of incident CKD at 3 years was 12.6%.
  • In adjusted analysis, the highest vs lowest quartile of total red meat intake was associated with a 73% increased likelihood of incident CKD (aOR, 1.73; P<.001 style="list-style-type:circle;">
  • Association was stronger for processed red meat (aOR, 1.99; P<.001>
  • Odds of incident CKD per daily serving:
    • 15% with total red meat (aOR, 1.15; P<.001>
    • 28% with processed red meat (aOR, 1.28; P<.001 and>
    • Nil with unprocessed red meat (P=.279).
  • Likelihood of incident CKD was reduced by substituting 1 processed meat serving with poultry (28% drop), fish (39%), low-fat dairy (26%), nuts (28%), whole grains (30%), or legumes (31%).
  • Limitations

    • Observational design.
    • CKD defined by isolated creatinine measurements.

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